St. Cyprian Service Starts Tonight

Read more about St. Cyprian at Big Lucky Hoodoo.

Have your petition set with a fixed, dressed, blessed light on my St. Cyprian altar for a nine-day novena, chaplet, and community altar service for the Cyprianic Holy Days, September 17-25. 

I’ve been working with St. Cyprian of Antioch for almost 20 years now, but until recently, there has been very little information – or material from any of the many grimoires attributed to him – available in English. The past few years have seen an explosion of interest and information across numerous “occult subcultures” and some really smart people translating, publishing, and talking about this infamous saint. It’s honestly a really exciting time to be a devotee of St. Cyprian — the sorcerer saint, patron of the lovelorn, and refuge of the accursed — so if you aren’t already, why not introduce yourself?

Said to have been consecrated to the devil by his parents when he was 7 years old [*], Cyprian grew up studying and practicing the black arts, eventually setting up shop in Antioch as a sorcerer-for-hire. He tried every trick in the book to get the young Christian virgin Justina to give up her chaste ways, but no matter what demon or what magic he threw at her, she defeated it all by making the sign of the cross. Cyprian knew what the smart affiliation was at that point, as the legend goes, and he was baptized, renouncing his pagan sorcery. [*This is the version from the Golden Legend, Caxton trans.]

But other legends have circulated alongside those in the hagiographies – that his grimoires survived and have been in circulation ever since, that he ultimately renounced his renunciation of sorcery, that he never truly gave up sorcery at all. At any rate, this paradoxical figure has been popular globally, and most especially in the Spanish-speaking world, for hundreds of years, invoked by sorcerers for occult mastery and power, by tradesmen for help finding treasure, by lovers to secure the love of their targets, by diviners for psychic vision and necromancy, and by anyone trying to be free of mal ojo, crossed conditions, negativity, and bad luck. So you might petition St. Cyprian for:

– uncrossing and spiritual cleansing of people and/or places

– spiritual/psychic protection

– reversing of malefic stuff aimed your way

– love work, especially (but not only) of the compelling or intranquil type

– divination, psychic vision, necromancy, and other occult studies and practices

Lights will be set the night of September 17. There is some wiggle room and you can join up after the work starts as long as you see that there are still spots left and it doesn’t say “sold out.”

Read more or book your spot now at Seraphin Station.

Ascension Day Cleansing/Blessing bath herbs

Get a packet of Ascension Day bath herbs at Seraphin Station.

There’s a lovely Italian tradition relating to the Madonna of the Baths (patroness of the region’s numerous hot mineral springs). This annual blessing and cleansing at the Feast of the Ascension is under her aegis. The Feast of the Ascension is on May 26th this year.

So if you can get your hands on clean, unsprayed, food-grade roses and mint, this is a nice little cleansing and blessing rite you could do with those.

If you can’t get your hands on fresh, organic roses and mint, I have made a blend of dried mint leaves and rose petals available in the shop as Ascension Day Bath Herbs.

The Bath Rite

On the day before Ascension Day, gather rose petals and mint leaves before dark and put them in a bowl or basin of water. Ideally, this would be spring water, but since most of us don’t really have fresh springs anywhere near us anymore, use whatever makes sense to you and is sanitary here. Traditionally, you would invoke the blessings of the Madonna of the Baths, praying and asking her to bless the roses and mint as you added them so the water will bless and sanctify the body.

Leave the basin outside under the sky all night, and in the morning, wash with the water for spiritual cleansing and blessing.

Additional Uses and Considerations

It is nice in a full bath as well, and it can be used in home washing/cleansing, but I will tell you from personal experience that it does *not* keep well AT ALL. If you bring it inside and refrigerate it, you could very well still get mold pretty quickly, so unless you want to preserve it with a sufficient ratio of ethanol or some other real preservative, you should divide it into portions and freeze it if you want some for later. (And frankly, the scent is extremely delicate and light – ethanol would probably completely obliterate it.)

Mint in hoodoo is well known as an uncrossing, purifying, and protective herb that deals with troublesome people and troublesome spirits. But I’ve found that mint is especially good for troublesome thoughts as well — stuff like anxiety loops, negative internal dialogue, invasive thoughts. It can kind of short circuit that stuff.

And rose, although commonly thought of as a love herb, is also an herb of blessing. It’s strongly associated with Mary, and beyond that, has deep associations with many figures of the Divine Feminine in religions and cultures throughout history, across the globe. In some folk traditions, it’s used to clear up negativity and crossed conditions around your love life, and it finds its way into blends for psychic vision, protection, friendship, and general luck, as well. (Though if I wanted to use this for protection or home cleansing, I’d probably add a handful of basil, personally. And if you did that, you’d actually have a pretty good Peaceful Home blend, too, come to think of it…)

It’s especially useful for matters related to *self* love – self esteem, self confidence, and self-forgiveness. As such, it pairs with mint to give you a blend that can help remove negative thoughts and negative influences in the realm of love, absolutely including self-love, self-esteem, internal dialogue, all that kind of thing. And then of course the Madonna of the Baths is associated with healing.

Read More

Read more about the bath herbs, or order some now, at Seraphin Station.

Learn more about the Madonna of the Baths via Storie di Napoli.

Hear a traditional folk song for the Madonna of the Baths (and read a traditional prayer, as well, if you can read Neapolitan) via Italian Folk Magic.