14 Holy Helpers Oil + 15% off Blessing/Healing formulas, 2 days only

The Fourteen Holy Helpers are saints or holy figures who were petitioned in medieval Europe during the terror of the Black Death. Also known as the “auxiliary saints,” they were called on as a group for protection from a variety of illnesses and troubles that would strike both people and animals. Their popularity continues to this day.

While you will occasionally see variations in a few of the names depending on region, the “standard” 14 Holy Helpers and their particular areas of specialty are as follows:

  • Agathius – headache, agonizing pain
  • Barbara – fever, sudden death, fire
  • Blaise – illnesses of the throat and protection for domestic animals
  • Catherine of Alexandria – sudden death, diseases of tongue
  • Christopher – plague, sudden death, and temptations while traveling
  • Cyriacus – temptation on one’s death bed, eye disease, possession
  • Denis – headache, demonic possession
  • Erasmus (aka St. Elmo) – intestinal and stomach troubles
  • Eustace – family discord and strife, fire
  • George – domestic animals, boils, lesions
  • Giles – plague, for good confessions, for the maimed and beggars, epilepsy, mental illness, nightmares, panic
  • Margaret of Antioch – childbirth, protection from devils, headache, backache
  • Pantaleon – physicians, midwives, against cancer and TB
  • Vitus (aka St. Guy)- epilepsy, lightning and storms, protection for animals and from animal bites

I released this oil years ago as part of an expanded line of blessing, uncrossing, and protection formulas, having no idea at the time that we’d one day be facing a sort of modern plague of our own. So I figured now’s a good time to make another batch of this stuff.

One of those multi-use spiritual oils that’s worth keeping in the supply cupboard because one little bottle does so much.

Enjoy 15% off tangibles in the Blessing, Healing, Protection, Uncrossing, Spiritual Cleansing, and Saints/Spirits categories on any order totaling $20 or more, at Seraphin Station or at Etsy. Offer good now through midnight CST on Monday the 17th. Discount is automatic – no coupon code necessary.

Read more or order now at Seraphin Station.

N.B. Not a medicine and not a substitute for proper medical treatment by a qualified medical practitioner.

The Blue Charm: Rustic Hoodoo Amulet Necklace

For this amulet necklace, I’ve basically deconstructed a classic rural Southern-style conjure bag, aka a mojo or toby, and made jewelry out of it.


This is backwoods conjure the way it used to be. It’s miles away from the shiny city general store with imported spices and soaps and fabrics. This is the part of the country where floorwash is made with chamber lye, not ammonia and certainly not Florida Water. New curtains come from recycled worn-out clothes, and those clothes come from recycled flour and feed sacks.

Old barn and field gear provides tiny scraps of leather. Copper, brass, and steel are scavenged from derelict machinery and buildings. Scraps of fabric — saved in an old cookie tin with thimbles and thread — tell 50 years of stories in a square inch: palest blue silk of a once-treasured gown; crisp white poplin once someone’s Sunday best; a thin strip of woven blue and gold once a hair ribbon won at the county fair. Whether passed on or simply moved on, those who once owned these bits and scraps are no longer here. And nobody was listening for their voices before you and I got here. Not everybody can hear them, after all.

This necklace is for those who can – or who want to. It’s for the medium, the storyteller, the card reader, the local historian, for the mad prophet, the family memory-keeper, the soothsayer. It’s for those who live too much in their own heads and those who don’t live enough in theirs, for those who want to remember and those who cannot forget. It’s for magpies of myth, keepers of scraps, and weavers of visions, those who can read the narrative in excavated brick or crumbling beams or rough-loomed fabric remnants. It’s for those who don’t go the long way round to avoid the cemetery at night and who aren’t afraid to slow down and chance hearing whispers in the wind.

Continue reading “The Blue Charm: Rustic Hoodoo Amulet Necklace”

16th century Aztec charm to cross water safely

This slightly complex charm to cross a river or running water safely requires the traveler to apply juice from the plants called yauhtli [1] and tepepapaloquilitl [2] to the chest, to have the stones beryl and sardonyx as well as an oyster [3], and to keep the eyes of a large fish enclosed securely in the mouth.

The beryl is to be held in the hand. It’s unclear to me from the manuscript whether the sardonyx and the oyster are also held in the hand or kept in the mouth with the fish eyes.

Near as I can tell, these herbs are specified because they are sacred to the god Tlaloc, the lord of rain and celestial waters.

I think I’d need a charm to help me be brave enough to try this charm.

Tagetes lucida at Botanischer Garten Erlangen. By manfred.sause@volloeko.de – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, Wikimedia Commons

Notes

[1] Mexican marigold, Tagetes lucida

[2] lit. mountain butterfly weed; could be another type of marigold, or Porophyllum punctatum, or one of a number of plants called deer herb depending on who you ask.

[3] Probably. The translator was not entirely sure. If it’s an oyster, it would be sans shell.

Sources

The De La Cruz-Badiano Aztec Herbal of 1552. William Gates, trans. The Maya Society, Baltimore: 1939, p. 103.

“Four Hundred Flowers: The Aztec Herbal Pharmacopoeia, Part 1, Yauhtli and Cempoalxochitl.” Mexicolore. 27 Jan. 2008. Accessed 25 April 2021. Available at http://www.mexicolore.co.uk/aztecs/health/aztec-herbal-pharmacopoeia-part-1.

Nixtamal99. “Porophyllum punctatum.” Masa Americana. 27 July 2019. Accessed 25 April 2021. Available at masaamerica.food.blog/2019/07/27/porophyllum-punctatum/.

Nixtamal99. “Tepepapaloquilitl.” Masa Americana. 27 July 2019. Accessed 25 April 2021. Available at masaamerica.food.blog/2019/07/27/tepepapaloquilitl/.